History

Mash History
1800

Early 1800s

The earliest known record of the Mash family is from the early 1800s.

A letter published by Coutts & Co. reveals that an Admiral in Lord Nelson’s fleet owed three pounds, seven shillings and six pence to Joseph Mash (b.1793 d.1844). The document reveals Joseph was a potato trader at Spitalfields Market, London.

1860

1860

Through the 1800s the business continued to prosper, with the opening of a flower stall in Brixton and the produce business re-locating to Long Acre, London.

Through the 1800s the business continued to trade in potatoes and was passed to Joseph’s son Henry Joseph Mash (b.1827 d.1899). During this time the business was known as H.J. Mash and expanded to include a flower stall in Brixton market (pictured here). Henry went on to marry Ms Lucy Austin. Of a wealthy background, Ms Austin could afford to invest in the company. The business was renamed Mash & Austin Ltd. and began offering a wider array of fresh produce to hotels, restaurants and ship stores from a re-located premises in Long Acre, London.

1896

1896

Henry Joseph Junior (pictured here) acquires two farms allowing Mash & Austin Ltd. to grow their own produce for the first time.

Henry Joseph passed the business on to his son, Henry Joseph Junior. In the late 1880s Henry Joseph Junior’s three sons, Martin, Harry and William all traded in Mash & Austin Ltd. under the close guidance of their father and two uncles. During this time Henry Joseph Junior and his sons acquired two farms in Marlow and Chesham (1896) and started to grow their own produce. Martin focused his time in Covent Garden while Harry worked on the farm at Marlow and William at Chesham farm.

1936

1936

In 1936 the business splits amicably, Harry goes on to run the Marlow farm, whilst Martin and William continue to develop the Mash & Austin Ltd. business in Covent Garden and Chesham.

1937

1937

The business becomes Mash & Murrell, focusing on ship stores. In the golden era of cruising the business flourished with 140 staff providing produce to the ports of Liverpool, London and Southampton.

In 1937 the grandfather of the current owner (Martin), decides to part ways and creates Mash & Murrell with his son Jack. The Murrell name came from Martin’s wife’s sister who married William Murrell, a businessman who went on to become a salesperson for the business. With the business flourishing in the economic climate, the company relocated from Long Acre to Henrietta Street to focus on the ship store aspect of the business. Martin’s two sons Jack and Dick join the business with Jack working centrally at Mash & Murrell in Covent Garden whilst his brother Dick worked at the Chesham farm.

1967

1967

A merger creates Mash Roe Ltd – a company that would become the pioneer of large scale food service distribution.

Following the death of his grandfather in 1967, Martin Mash and his dad (Jack) take over the business. With the shipping industry in decline in the 1970s, due to the new found aviation industry, Martin inherited a dwindling business and took the decision to merge with another local business Fred Roe, creating Mash Roe Ltd.

2001

2000

Mash Purveyors Ltd is founded with five staff selling produce to the finest hotels and restaurants in and around London.

At 28, Martin’s son Charlie decided to sell his shares in Mash & Roe Ltd. to start a new venture. In 2000 Charlie founded the company that we know today, Mash Purveyors Ltd, selling top-end produce to the finest hotels and restaurants in and around London. Martin Mash also joined the company which to this day continues the family traditions.

2014

2014

The company continues to thrive whilst remaining to true to the ethos on which it was founded – Thought for Food

Today, the family still works as it did all those years ago, sourcing products from established English growers while the international tastes of its customers mean that it also sources from a global pool of quality suppliers.